Central lymph nodes

From WikiMD's Wellness Encyclopedia

Central lymph nodes are a group of lymph nodes located in the center of the body. They are part of the lymphatic system, which is a network of tissues and organs that help rid the body of toxins, waste, and other unwanted materials. The primary function of the lymphatic system is to transport lymph, a fluid containing infection-fighting white blood cells, throughout the body.

Etymology[edit | edit source]

The term "lymph node" comes from the Latin word 'lympha', which means 'connected to water', and the Greek word 'node', which means 'knot'. This is likely due to the fact that lymph nodes often swell when they are fighting an infection, giving them a knotted appearance.

Function[edit | edit source]

Central lymph nodes play a crucial role in the body's immune response. They filter lymph fluid, trapping bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances, which are then destroyed by special white blood cells called lymphocytes.

Related Terms[edit | edit source]

  • Lymph: A clear fluid that travels through the lymphatic system and carries cells that help fight infections and diseases.
  • Lymphocytes: A type of white blood cell that is part of the immune system.
  • Lymphatic system: A network of tissues and organs that help rid the body of toxins, waste, and other unwanted materials.

See Also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]


Central lymph nodes Resources
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Contributors: Prab R. Tumpati, MD