Centroacinar cell

From WikiMD's Wellness Encyclopedia

Centroacinar cells are a type of cell found in the pancreas. They are located in the acini of the pancreas, specifically in the center of the acinus, hence the name "centroacinar". These cells are part of the exocrine system of the pancreas and play a crucial role in the production and secretion of pancreatic juice, which aids in digestion.

Structure[edit | edit source]

Centroacinar cells are small, lightly staining cells that are located in the center of the acinus of the pancreas. They are characterized by their location and their relatively pale cytoplasm. The centroacinar cells form the beginning of the intercalated duct system of the pancreas.

Function[edit | edit source]

The primary function of centroacinar cells is to produce and secrete a bicarbonate-rich fluid that is a component of pancreatic juice. This fluid helps to neutralize the acidity of the chyme (partially digested food) that enters the small intestine from the stomach. The bicarbonate ions from the centroacinar cells mix with the digestive enzymes secreted by the acinar cells to form the pancreatic juice.

Clinical significance[edit | edit source]

Abnormalities or damage to the centroacinar cells can lead to pancreatic disorders. For example, in chronic pancreatitis, the centroacinar cells may be damaged, leading to a decrease in the production of bicarbonate-rich fluid, which can result in digestive problems.

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]


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Contributors: Prab R. Tumpati, MD