Cross education

From WikiMD's Food, Medicine & Wellness Encyclopedia

Cross education is a phenomenon where training one limb can lead to improvements in strength and skill in the untrained limb. This effect has been observed in both upper and lower limbs and is thought to be due to neural adaptations in the brain and spinal cord.

History[edit | edit source]

The concept of cross education was first described by Robert Adams in 1836, who observed that patients who had suffered a stroke could regain function in their paralyzed arm by exercising their healthy arm. This observation was later confirmed by other researchers, including Charles Sherrington, who coined the term "cross education" in 1894.

Mechanisms[edit | edit source]

The exact mechanisms underlying cross education are not fully understood, but several theories have been proposed. One theory suggests that cross education occurs due to changes in the motor cortex of the brain. When one limb is trained, the motor cortex undergoes changes that allow it to control the movements of the untrained limb more effectively.

Another theory suggests that cross education occurs due to changes in the spinal cord. When one limb is trained, the spinal cord learns to activate the muscles of the untrained limb more effectively.

Applications[edit | edit source]

Cross education has potential applications in rehabilitation and sports training. In rehabilitation, cross education could be used to help patients regain function in a paralyzed or injured limb. In sports training, cross education could be used to enhance performance by training one limb to improve the strength and skill of the other limb.

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]


Cross education Resources
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