Central hearing loss

From WikiMD's Wellness Encyclopedia

Central hearing loss is a type of hearing loss that occurs when the central nervous system is unable to process the sounds that it receives from the ears. This is different from peripheral hearing loss, which is caused by problems with the ear itself. Central hearing loss can be caused by a variety of conditions, including stroke, brain tumor, and neurological disorders.

Causes[edit | edit source]

Central hearing loss can be caused by a variety of conditions that affect the central nervous system. These include:

Symptoms[edit | edit source]

The symptoms of central hearing loss can vary depending on the underlying cause. However, common symptoms include:

  • Difficulty understanding speech, especially in noisy environments
  • Difficulty locating the source of a sound
  • Difficulty distinguishing between different sounds

Diagnosis[edit | edit source]

Diagnosis of central hearing loss typically involves a series of audiological tests to determine the patient's ability to hear and understand sounds. These tests may include pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and auditory brainstem response testing.

Treatment[edit | edit source]

Treatment for central hearing loss depends on the underlying cause. In some cases, treating the underlying condition can improve hearing. In other cases, hearing aids or cochlear implants may be used to improve hearing. Speech therapy may also be beneficial for some patients.

See also[edit | edit source]






Wiki.png

Navigation: Wellness - Encyclopedia - Health topics - Disease Index‏‎ - Drugs - World Directory - Gray's Anatomy - Keto diet - Recipes

Search WikiMD


Ad.Tired of being Overweight? Try W8MD's physician weight loss program.
Semaglutide (Ozempic / Wegovy and Tirzepatide (Mounjaro / Zepbound) available.
Advertise on WikiMD

WikiMD is not a substitute for professional medical advice. See full disclaimer.

Credits:Most images are courtesy of Wikimedia commons, and templates Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY SA or similar.

Contributors: Prab R. Tumpati, MD