Eurasian cuisine of Singapore and Malaysia

From WikiMD's Food, Medicine & Wellness Encyclopedia

Eurasian cuisine of Singapore and Malaysia refers to the unique culinary traditions and dishes associated with the Eurasian community in Singapore and Malaysia. This cuisine is a blend of European and Asian influences, reflecting the diverse heritage of the Eurasian community.

History[edit | edit source]

The history of Eurasian cuisine in Singapore and Malaysia dates back to the colonial era, when European settlers intermarried with local Asian populations. The resulting Eurasian community developed a distinct cuisine that combined elements of both European and Asian cooking.

Ingredients[edit | edit source]

Eurasian cuisine in Singapore and Malaysia makes use of a wide range of ingredients. These include spices such as turmeric, cumin, and coriander, as well as coconut milk, tamarind, and chili peppers. Meat, particularly chicken, beef, and pork, is also a common ingredient.

Dishes[edit | edit source]

Some of the most popular dishes in Eurasian cuisine include Devil's Curry, a spicy curry dish made with chicken or pork; Feng, a pork offal stew; and Sugee Cake, a rich cake made with semolina and almonds.

Influence[edit | edit source]

The influence of Eurasian cuisine can be seen in the wider food culture of Singapore and Malaysia. Many Eurasian dishes have been adopted by other communities and have become part of the mainstream culinary landscape.

See also[edit | edit source]


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Contributors: Prab R. Tumpati, MD