Cenchrus ciliaris

From WikiMD's Wellness Encyclopedia

Cenchrus ciliaris, commonly known as Buffelgrass, is a species of grass native to most of Africa, southern Asia, and Australia. It has been introduced to many other parts of the world as a pasture grass and is now a common species in the Americas, the Caribbean, and the Mediterranean region.

Description[edit | edit source]

Cenchrus ciliaris is a perennial grass that grows in clumps up to 1.5 meters tall. The leaves are linear, up to 25 cm long and 1 cm wide. The inflorescence is a dense, cylindrical spike up to 8 cm long and 1.5 cm wide, containing numerous burr-like spikelets.

Distribution and habitat[edit | edit source]

Cenchrus ciliaris is native to a wide range of climates and soils in Africa, southern Asia, and Australia. It has been introduced to other parts of the world, including the Americas, the Caribbean, and the Mediterranean region, where it has become naturalized. It is typically found in grasslands, savannas, and other open habitats.

Uses[edit | edit source]

Cenchrus ciliaris is widely used as a pasture grass in tropical and subtropical regions. It is drought-tolerant and can grow in poor soils, making it a valuable forage crop in arid regions. It is also used for erosion control and as a firebreak.

Environmental impact[edit | edit source]

In some regions, Cenchrus ciliaris has become an invasive species, displacing native vegetation and altering ecosystems. It is particularly problematic in the southwestern United States, where it increases the frequency and intensity of wildfires.

See also[edit | edit source]

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Contributors: Prab R. Tumpati, MD